10 Ways to Find Native Listening Material

I am on your side by Kevin_Morris

Coffee and book not required.

Having access to lots and lots and lots of native spoken material for listening comprehension is extremely important. Unfortunately, not everyone is surrounded by speakers of their target language. If you’re one of the lucky people who can travel to a country where their target language is the spoken, then this article is not for you. You have no shortage of access to native listening material.

If, on the other hand, you’re stuck in a country that doesn’t speak your target language – listen up. You can find native speaker listening material to practice with, and it doesn’t require plane tickets.

  1. Podcasts – With a quick search you can find podcasts in almost any language. You don’t have to limit yourself to instructional or lesson focused podcasts either (though there are certainly tons of them). It can help more to find podcasts for native speakers of your target language about a topic you’re interested in.
  2. YouTube – Just like with podcasts a quick search in your target language can open up a whole world of videos. You can search for topics you’re interested in, instructional videos, movie reviews or anything else. If you find a video you particularly like or with particularly useful conversation in it then you can download the video off of YouTube and then rip the audio to an .mp3 with AoA Audio Extractor. Then you can listen to it wherever you want.
  3. Movies – Movie services like Netflix are constantly adding more and more foreign movies, most of them subtitled and not dubbed. You can also buy a lot of U.S. movies re-dubbed in other languages off of Amazon. If both of those fail you there are tons and tons of streaming sites you can find that feature movies and shows from various countries or, if you’re feeling a touch unscrupulous, there are plenty of torrent sites out there featuring foreign media. You can also use the Audio Extractor linked to above to pull the audio off these and make the conversations into .mp3 files to listen to while you do other things.
  4. RhinoSpikeRhinospike.com is a service where you can have a native speaker record text in your target language and post the .mp3 file for free. In return you can record audio files for people learning your native language. There are a lot of great ways to make using Rhinospike more efficient, from writing conversations to have recorded to downloading off of the archive, but it’s useful enough just using it as intended to get free, customized, native-speaker produced audio to practice with.

  5. Music – Listening and singing along to music in your target language may not be the best way to improve conversational listening comprehension, but it is a great way to work on pronunciation and mimicking native accents. It can also go a long way toward easing you into thinking in your target language as you find more and more songs from your target language endlessly looping in your head. With Pandora, GrooveShark and Spotify you have no excuse for not finding some music you like in your target language.
  6. Audio Books – Audio books may require a little more hunting depending on what target language you’ve chosen, but the benefits are endless. You get hours of material written by a native and read by a native on a range of topics and including conversations. Plus, like the rest of these you can put them on your .mp3 player of choice and listen to them while you’re doing other things. Win.
  7. News – Whether or not you have a TV service that gives you access to international news stations, most post videos online for free. A quick search in your target language for the word ‘news’ and ‘video’ should turn up tons of results. Newscasters are often trained to speak quickly but clearly in whatever accent is that country’s most neutral, so they make a good example to try and match.
  8. TV Shows – Okay, maybe this should be lumped in with movies, but it’s easy to find tons of TV shows to watch in your target language. Barring that you can usually find the more popular U.S. TV shows dubbed into your target language. Re-watching every episode of Lost in your target language is an excellent, if time consuming, way to get some practice.
  9. Skype – As you practice more and more on things like Lang-8 or start poking around on CouchSurfing or social networks in your target language, you’ll begin to make friends who speak the language you want to be speaking. This is easily the best thing ever for learning a new language. That’s not to say you should view these people as nothing more than tools for conversation practice, you should be aiming for real friendships, but usually people are more than happy to have a quick chat on Skype. Make some time everyday, even if it’s just five minutes, to have a quick video chat with someone on Skype and you’ll progress faster than you know it.
  10. ForvoForvo.com is similar to RhinoSpike, except with a focus specifically on the pronunciation of single words or phrases. While this means you can’t get whole conversations recorded like you can on RhinoSpike, it does offer an excellent opportunity to get those really tricky words or sounds that you always have trouble with smoothed out and perfected. Best of all, you can focus on all the particularly difficult phonemes or make playlists of similar sounds to build your own target language tongue twisters.

These are just the first ten options for finding native audio that came to mind, there are tons more out there. If you have any you’ve particularly liked using in the past, share them with us in the comments! We’re always looking for more suggestions.

Photo Credit: Kevin Morris

Adam is a former English teacher turned personal trainer and writer. He’s addicted to learning, parkour and martial arts. In addition to being a voracious bibliophile Adam’s fascinated by anything related to health, fitness and language. When not studying or training he can usually be found curled up with a good piece of fiction. You can e-mail Adam at Adam@RoadtoEpic.com

  • Darwin Apolinares

    This article is very helpful. You could also learn english
    through skype. Thanks to technology. I have also tried some lessons by skype
    with a native speaker from http://preply.com/en/skype/english-native-speakers
    and it was also worth trying.