My Weekend Of Starvation

In Her Absence by Brian Hathcock

48 hours of self-imposed deprivation.

This past weekend I decided to try an impromptu experiment. I know intermittent fasting has a wide range of health benefits, but how would a reasonably extended fast affect me? Unfortunately, I didn’t have the ability to go get blood work or anything done beforehand or afterward, so this was more of an unofficial personal experiment. Regardless, it was an interesting experience.

The Method

I originally set out to go for an entire weekend consuming nothing but water and, in the morning, coffee. My plan was to have one last large meal on Friday night at 7 p.m. and then not eat again until Monday at 7 p.m. for a total of 72 hours without food. In reality, for reasons I’ll explain a little further down, I only continued the fast until Sunday at 7 p.m. for a total of 48 hours. In the interest of doing what I could to combat any potential muscle loss, I did extra workouts on both days including strength training and high intensity interval training.

So, for 48 hours (Friday 7 p.m. to Sunday 7 p.m.) I consumed absolutely nothing but water and coffee and performed moderately taxing bodyweight and barbell strength training workouts and high intensity interval sprints.

The Results

Overall, it was a really interesting experience. I noticed some very basic changes in body composition, but the best parts for me were the miscellaneous effects I noticed and the benefit of the experience. Let’s look at some of those effects.

Weight

If I had a reliable way to do it I would have measured bodyfat percentage as well but unfortunately I couldn’t, so I was left tracking weight. The first day showed the most dramatic change – a loss of 1.5 kg or 3.3 pounds. The second day of fasting resulted in another smaller loss of 0.6 kg or 1.3 pounds.

After the fasting was over, I continued to track my bodyweight to determine if the changes would last or if the next few days of eating would put me right back where I was. The first day of eating showed an increase of 1 kg or 2.2 pounds. The next two days of eating, however showed subsequent reductions of 0.4 kg (0.88 pounds) and 0.2 kg (0.44 pounds). That brought the overall total to a net loss of 1.7 kg or 3.74 pounds of bodyweight.

Measurements

Being an informal experiment I didn’t take extensive measurements, only waist circumference. The first day of fasting showed a reduction of 1.5 inches. The second day of fasting resulted in a reduction of 0.5 inches, corresponding to the smaller drop in bodyweight. After the third day of eating, my waist circumference had increased by 0.75 inches. That makes the net total of 1.25 inches (-3.17 cm) lost around my waist.

Miscellaneous Observations

There were a handful of things I found interesting about the experiment that didn’t really fall into any specific categories.

  • Reduction in Body Temperature – Part way into the end of the first day of fasting and all through the second day I found it extremely difficult to maintain body temperature. My wife, in the same room wearing clothing with comparable amounts of insulation, would be perfectly comfortable while I would be teeth-chatteringly freezing. I wound up putting on a jacket and sitting in front of the heater in our office in an attempt to get warm. Conversely, as soon as I broke my fast I became overheated and even started sweating and felt extremely warm after every meal for the next few days until I started feeling normal again.
  • Discomfort Plateau – This is the primary reason I decided to end my fast early, the reaching of a discomfort plateau. One of the reasons for attempting this experiment was as a personal test to see how much deprivation and discomfort I could take. I found out though that the hunger of a fast doesn’t increase linearly. Instead, I became extremely hungry by the middle of the first fasting day and then stayed that hungry until I ended my fast. This indicates to me that I could arguably handle any length of food deprivation since the discomfort doesn’t increase past a certain point.
  • No Reduction in Performance – During my fast I showed no reduction in performance in any of my exercises and had no trouble adding to the amount I was lifting on both days. Additionally, there was no degradation of my mental faculties. Honestly, I felt like my thinking was even more sharp and focused than normal, although I’m not sure if it actually was or if that was imagined.
  • Taste Enhancement – This may be another one that’s just all in my head, but everything I eat now is exponentially more flavorful. I can detect more spices and ingredients in foods and taste more differences in water from various sources. I’ve noticed it seems like it’s slowly going back to normal, so I might be re-acclimating to things. I suppose that’s why they say hunger’s the best spice.
  • Comfort with Hunger – Not only have I found I’m much more comfortable being hungry, but I’ve also found that it takes less food on average to satisfy my hunger. I’ve heard people suggest this is the result of my stomach reducing in size in the absence of being stretched out by food, however as far as I can tell that’s just conjecture and I’ve not seen any reliable scientific backing for that claim.

Conclusion

In total it was an interesting experience, though not one I would likely be soon to repeat. The loss of 3.74 pounds and 1.25 inches was a positive benefit, and I didn’t find any downsides to it except for the feeling of hunger itself and the issues with keeping my body temperature up. That being said, I didn’t test any other general health markers or design it to proper experimental rigor and therefore there may have been plenty of ill effects I simply missed.

Would I recommend any to do this? Regularly, probably not. If you absolutely positively need to lose a few pounds or a few inches immediately, this could be an option though it may not be the healthiest long term. I do think the experience itself is worth trying at least once for everyone simply to get exposed to the discomfort of true hunger. Few people who live in wealthy, industrialized nations ever really get to feel what it is to be hungry. I also think it’s a good exercise in willpower and teaching yourself to ignore temptation.

What does everyone else think? Has anyone else tried any extended water fasting? Did you have a similar experience? Share it in the comments!

Photo Credit: Brian Hathcock

Learn 1,000 Words in 30 Days

Korean Dictionary by Bittegitte

Is it possible to learn 1,000 new words in 30 days?

Being fairly well invested at this point in our challenge to learn to speak Korean in six months, we’ve decided to toss another minor challenge on top of it.

Learning 1,000 new words in Korean in 30 days

The motivation for this is simple, I just don’t feel our vocabulary is progressing quite as quickly as I would like it to for meeting our 6 month challenge. I’m also finding that in many cases our vocabulary is the limiting factor in the speed of progress in other areas of practice. I figure the best way to fix this is by learning the 1,000 most common words in Korean.

Why the 1,000 most common? Well, like I’ve said before, the 80/20 rule applies to language too. By focusing on the most common 1,000 words we’ll be taking the most efficient route and learning the stuff we’re most likely to need to know first.

Why in 30 days? Well, for two reasons to be honest. The first reason is that we’re on a constrained timeline. Our goal is to speak Korean in six months, if we take four months to learn those thousand words, we’re not going to be able to make as much total progress. The second reason is because it’s a challenge. 1,000 words in 30 days probably sounds crazy to most people (a lot like learning a language in 6 months probably does), which is a perfectly good reason to see if we can pull it off.

How are we going to go about it? The first step is finding a listing of the 1,000 most common Korean words. That part is easy, a quick Google search has given me this one which is likely what we’ll use.

With our list in hand, the next step is to divide and conquer. A quick bit of math reveals that 1,000 words divided into 30 days comes down to 33.3 words per day. Since I have no interest in learning 1/3rd of a word everyday, I’m going to round that up to 34 words per day.

I do realize that at 34 words per day we can actually learn 1,000 words in 29 days, but I’m going to assume we’ll need that extra day for review anyway.

Everyday we will tackle the next 34 words using all of the memorization hacks we have available to us, from SRS systems like Anki to good old-fashioned memory hooks. If, by the end of the day, we haven’t learned all 34 words then I’m not going to worry about it too much. The most wonderful part of this challenge is even if we have a dismal 50% success rate, we’ll still have learned 500 of the most common Korean words – an accomplishment I would be proud of on its own.

Anyone else want to try to learn 1,000 words in 30 days?

Polyphasic Sleep: A False Start

Barely over a week has passed in our polyphasic sleep experiment and already it looks like we’re going to have to call it quits. We’ve both accepted new jobs and, while we tried to work around it, have found the two schedules just refuse to play nice together.

In my opinion, in the short-term it was a huge success. By the end of this past week we had adapted fully to the schedule, and both were really loving the few extra hours. It doesn’t seem like an hour or two extra would be worth much, but it felt like a ton of extra productive time.

Because of that, we definitely intend to pick this experiment back up once our schedules fall back under our own control. So far, we’ve had no issues adjusting back to monophasic sleep, so we’ve also been contemplating an on-off version.

Keep checking in for when we can pick things back up, as well as a more in-depth review of our short time experimenting with our sleep patterns. Do you have any experience with it? Let us know in the comments!

Experiment: Polyphasic Sleep

Caroline and I are two very ambitious people. This site, and it’s dedication to paving the way to being epic, is proof positive of that. We have a list of martial arts we want to learn longer than I can count, we both have around 10 instruments we want to learn, we’re currently studying Japanese, Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean, Russian, German and French. We want to get in shape, and to get as good as possible at Parkour, breakdancing and acrobatics.

On top of all this, we’re renovating our house and working on starting two businesses, writing several blogs and I write on the side as the Cincinnati Martial Arts Examiner occasionally. We’re also both working on our own novels. Oh, right, we have to eat too. Forgot about that.

Frankly – there’s just not enough time in a day.

Pondering this perplexing problem I remembered something I had read about a few years ago while still in college called ‘polyphasic sleep’. As it turns out, it may be just the solution we’ve been looking for.

How it works

The theory behind polyphasic sleep (poly – many, phasic – parts/phases) is that rather than condense all of your sleep into one large block overnight, like most people do, you spread your sleep out into multiple parts over the course of the day and night.

Why would you want to do that?

Well, as it turns out we’re learning that the only part of sleep that actually seems to serve any rejuvenatory purpose is the Rapid Eye Movement (REM) stage of sleep. The REM stage is the part of sleep during which you experience dreams, as well as the part of sleep during which the brain is closest to being awake from an bio-electrical standpoint. The problem is, during normal overnight monophasic sleep it usually takes the brain about 90 to 110 minutes to complete a sleep cycle. That means only about 20-25% of the time spent sleeping at night is doing anything really functional.

That’s pretty inefficient. Polyphasic sleeping seeks to train the body to enter the REM stage as quickly as possible (if not immediately) upon falling asleep by severely limiting the duration of sleep. That means that the rest of the 75-80% of wasted sleep time can be skipped, dropping the amount of sleep needed to feel rested and rejuvenated to the neighborhood of 2 to 4 hours of total sleep.

Potential benefits

  • More Free Time – This is the big one really. I, for one, have issues getting up sometimes in the morning, and generally wind up spending between 6 to 8 hours a night sleeping. With polyphasic sleep that time can be reduced to 2 to 4 hours, meaning we gain between 4 to 6 waking hours a day to go do something epic.
  • Better Dream Recall – Supposedly, switching to polyphasic sleep greatly increases your dream recall. This may seem like a minor thing to most people, but I have some lucid dreaming experiments I’d like to play with down the road, and I know this skill will come in handy then.

Potential detriments

  • Sleep Deprivation – Some people say that a polyphasic sleep pattern is unhealthy to follow for extended periods of time because it causes sleep deprivation. Even those who do say it’s sustainable admit that the acclimation period when you first start has something of a zombifying effect until your body readjusts.
  • Social Problems – The other big problem most people cite is that it just doesn’t conform well with the rest of society. This seems to be the number one reason polyphasic people return to monophasic sleeping – either they felt it made social events or work difficult or it caused too much trouble within the family schedule. The reason I didn’t try this back in college was because I couldn’t easily fit the nap schedule around my classes.

Our experiment

Experiment might be a little too strict of a word here, since I doubt we’ll wind up being nearly as scientific about this as we should be, but oh well. Our plan is to try out a slightly modified version of what’s called the ‘Everyman’ sleep schedule.

We’ll start out by getting 3 hours of core sleep very night between midnight and 3 a.m. Then we’ll take two 20 minute naps through the day, one at 11 a.m. and another at 4 p.m., cutting our total sleep time down to around 4 hours.

After we’ve adjusted to that, we’ll try cutting the core sleep by an hour and seeing if we can adjust to that as well. That would cut us down to 3 hours of total sleep a night, giving us between 3 and 5 more useful hours a day on average.

We plan on trying a few other sleep schedules over time too, but that will come later. We’ll keep you updated with how things progress every now and then, as well as all the tips and techniques we learn while experimenting.

If you’re interested in learning more about polyphasic sleep right this minute, you can start with these two links:

Are you a polyphasic sleeper? Do you think all of this is absolute nonsense? Let us know in the comments.