Getting Away With Murder & Living 14 Lives

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SMBC - 20120902

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While all that business about every one of your cells being replaced every seven years isn’t entirely true, people do tend to go through major changes in their lives in cycles of seven years or so. Think about your own life broken down into 7 year chunks. How different were you at 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, 56 and so on?

Beyond the fact that we tend to change in tastes and personality every 7 years, we also tend to refresh our social networks every septennial. That’s not to say you completely abandon your old friends for new ones every seven years, but people tend to replace a majority of them and your primary friends shift. Add on to that fact the general guideline that it takes roughly seven years or so on average to master a new skill or profession and you wind up with what almost amounts to a brand new person every seven years.

I think that’s absolutely fantastic.

Your 14 Lives

Assuming you live to be 100 years old, broken into seven year increments, you’ll get to live a total of fourteen lives. If we cut out the first seven years since a lot of that time is spent getting comfortable in your own skin and even bring your life expectancy down a bit to be less optimistic you still have about 11 lives to make use of.

Eleven opportunities to completely reinvent yourself. Eleven opportunities to start over fresh and be the person you want to be. Eleven opportunities to go try something new and crazy knowing that after seven years you can ditch that and try something else.

Isn’t that exciting?

In general this is a process that you’ll go through on your own, whether you intend to or not. No matter what you do you’re going to change and it’ll probably happen in roughly seven year increments and even if you fight it, you’re only going to delay the inevitable.

What’s worse is that, much like dreading and fussing over and denying the coming of your eventual real demise is only going to make the time you’ve got here right now less enjoyable, worrying and dreading over your septennial resurrection or trying to deny it completely will only taint the time you’ve got now.

Rather than dread these septenni-deaths, embrace them. Make the most out of them. The way I see it I’m not interested in just letting myself die and be reborn every seven years, I take it upon myself to purposefully and intentionally murder my former self every seven years in order to be reborn the way I want.

Murder As a Form of Self-Improvement

Most people have no idea who they are.

I genuinely believe that. I really think that the vast majority of people have less of a notion of who they are, who they really are than the people around them do, because they never think to actually sit down and ask themselves, “Who the hell am I?”

That’s really sad to me, because not only do I think it takes a lot of the person’s self-determination away from them (how can you make informed decisions about where you want your future to go if you don’t even know who you are?) I also think it leads to an extreme lack of fulfillment. You have to know what you want to find a fulfilling life and that’s exponentially difficult if you don’t have a handle on your true self.

The septennial life cycle allows for a golden opportunity to closely examine who you are, who you really are, and change the parts you don’t like anymore.

These little deaths allow you to not only ask yourself the existentially important question, “Who the hell am I?”, but it also allows you to ask yourself the more important question practically, “Who the hell do I want to be?”

Because of this I relish these opportunities. I see them as an opportunity to murder my old self and become someone completely new.

Now, when I say murder that doesn’t mean you have to hate your old self. In fact I find that kind of attitude to be generally negative. I just use that term to emphasize the fact that I think it should be a directed, guided, intentional process. You’re putting your former self in the ground. Chapter closed. Moving on.

Making the Most of Your 11 Lives

Given the septennial nature of these mini-deaths I think it’s important not to squander them – they take too long to come around again to be wasteful with. To that end here are some things I think can help you make the most of your phoenixian transitions.

  • Let Go of Unfinished Business – Dwelling on your past life after it’s over is counter-productive. You’re not a ghost, so just let go. Even if you were really great at something in the past or there was a part of your life you loved that’s gone for one reason or another it’s best to just let it go. There’s a reason the roots for the word ‘nostalgia’ mean ‘old wounds’.

    Instead, focus on the boundless opportunities that lie ahead of you. The old things were great, but they’re gone and not coming back. Reliving past glory in your head is living in fiction. Turn your attention to all the lives you’ve got ahead of you instead. Think about all the possibilities and the great things you could do. Then go out and do them.

  • Don’t Cling to Life – Just because you’ve done something one way for the past seven years, for this whole lifetime, doesn’t mean you should refuse to let it go. There are certainly things you can choose to let carry over into your new life, but don’t artificially prolong the old one.

    Putting yourself on septennial life support because you’re scared to let yourself die is a natural reaction. Death is scary, even if it’s symbolic. Don’t fear the unknown though, embrace it. The unknown is potential. The unknown is a promise that there might be something more, something better. You can never improve in anything if you stay with your comfort zone, so step out of it and let yourself die – or even murder yourself on purpose – and get on with the process of being reborn as someone better.

  • Live Each Life Intentionally – Just letting yourself die and be reborn is good, but leaving the process unguided leaves so much potential on the table. Harness that potential by guiding the process as much as possible. Ask yourself during this seven year transition period what you like about yourself, who you really are and who you want to be.

    List all the things you dislike about yourself and all the things you love about yourself, list all the things you want to do or have always wished you could learn or try, then figure out all the things you can do to embrace the good things, chase your dreams and abandon everything about yourself you no longer like. Make it a purposeful, intentional process.

    This isn’t necessarily an easy thing. You may have to cut out old friends who are leading you down paths you don’t want to take, you may have to make big changes in your career or habits or routine.

    It’s all worth it though since it grants you the opportunity to live an entirely brand new life, chase your own destiny and master something you’ve always wished you could do.

Near Limitless Possibilities

The key principle of the idea of septennial lifespans is, determinism and social mobility aside, you have access to a near limitless amount of potential.

You don’t have to feel constrained by your current life. If you’re feeling unfulfilled and bored with life, if you feel like you’re missing out on something or chasing a goal you don’t really care about, that’s fine! You have the opportunity to write a brand new chapter, really a brand new book, every seven years. Bury the life you hate and rebuild the one you want to live atop its grave.

Have you gone through any big septennial life changes? Have any other tips you’d like to add to make the process more beneficial or efficient? Leave a comment and hare it with us! While you’re at it, go leave a friendly comment over at SMBC too, or pick up a prettier poster form of the comic above – they deserve it!

Photo Credit: Zach Weiner of Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal

Adam is a former English teacher turned personal trainer and writer. He’s addicted to learning, parkour and martial arts. In addition to being a voracious bibliophile Adam’s fascinated by anything related to health, fitness and language. When not studying or training he can usually be found curled up with a good piece of fiction. You can e-mail Adam at Adam@RoadtoEpic.com