How to Find Native Speakers and Learn Any Language Anywhere

Anonymity and the Internet by Stian Eikeland

You too can learn a language with the modern wonder of the Webternets!

When you’re learning a new language immersion, exposure and practice are all extremely important. Unfortunately, when it comes to the standard system of classroom language learning or do-it-yourself book and audio programs, you don’t really get much of all three. As a result most people think the best way to learn a language quickly and effectively is to move to a country that speaks your target language.

What if you can’t reasonably do that though? While I think there are enough ways to travel cheaply that anyone who wants it bad enough can find a way, I recognize that not everyone can reasonably run off abroad to learn a language. So how do you find native speakers to practice with?

Thankfully the glory of the Internet provides plentiful opportunities to find a language partner or teacher, both locally and abroad.

The Interconnected World

That’s right. The Internet is more than just cats, naked people and Rick Astley. You can actually use it for something useful.

Anymore just about everyone has an Internet connection. Unless someone’s printed this article out for you clearly you’re one of them. That level of interconnectedness means that even if the closest person who speaks your target language is 12,450.5 miles away (technically the farthest they can get without going into space) if they’re online then you can talk to each other.

On top of that the Internet has provided an excellent if unintentional searchable database of people all over the world – including in your own city. While previously finding the handful of speakers of a more obscure language in a city of a million people required a lot of detective work, now if they’ve mentioned in a profile somewhere they speak it you can look them up in a few seconds.

Finding Native Speakers Abroad

While not necessarily true everywhere, chances are if you’re learning a second language there are more people who speak it natively elsewhere than there are locally. That’s kind of the nature of second language learning for most people outside of multilingual nations.

That means that finding people to speak with remotely, people who are off in these other countries that speak your target language natively, is often easier than finding people locally. We’ll start there.

  • iTalkiiTalki is a site dedicated to exactly what I’m talking about – connecting people who want to practice and learn second languages with native speakers half a world away. iTalki is excellent because you have the option of connecting with people for free to just chat, or paying for actual lessons with a qualified teacher. Seriously, with iTalki out there you have no excuses for not practicing your target language with a native.

  • Lang-8Lang-8 has a similar goal to iTalki, except it’s all about writing. That doesn’t mean you can’t use it to find people to speak with though. The text correction is valuable enough, but in the forums there are thriving language exchange communities and it doesn’t take long for most people on Lang-8 to accumulate a long friends list – most of those people will be more than happy to get on Skype and practice each others’ languages.

  • Google – Yeah, Google. You can search for language exchanges (there are tons of them) or even figure out the words in your target language for ‘forum’ and find some groups in your target language. Once you’re there start talking to people and you’ll eventually find someone willing to chat. Easy.

With Skype or some other video/audio/chat program if you prefer it’s easy to pick a time and have a conversation. If they’re learning your native language you can spend 30 minutes in one and 30 minutes in the other – everybody wins. You can even find pretty affordable teachers and have one on one lessons.

What if you want actual, face to face human contact though? What if you’re really sick of sitting in front of a webcam? No problem, find someone local.

Finding Native Speakers Locally

If you live anywhere even remotely near civilization and are learning a language that is even somewhat common I am comfortable saying there are at least hundreds of people near you to practice with. Probably more. You just have to find them.

Thankfully, that’s not as hard as it used to be.

  • MeetupMeetup is a site devoted to bringing together people with common interests in areas where they might not otherwise find each other. If you’re near a reasonably major city there’s probably a Meetup group dedicated to hanging out and speaking your target language. Do a search both in English and in the target language and see what comes up. You can join the group and then go to one of their Meetups and you’ll find yourself surrounded by other speakers and learners of your target language all there to learn and practice.

  • CouchsurfingCouchsurfing, technically, is for finding people to stay with when travelling. It has some awesome search functionality though, so you can use it to do a search in your own city filtered by language spoken. What you get is a long list of everyone on Couchsurfing near you who speaks or is learning your target language. Then you can send them each a message introducing yourself as a learner of their language and offering to meet for coffee or something and chat to practice. You can even open up your own home and host people from a country that speaks your target language.

  • Google – I won’t link to Google twice. It bears repeating though, you can find people locally using Google. Search for groups at nearby universities. Search for businesses in your area that originate in a country that speaks the language you’re learning. Here around Cincinnati there are tons of Korean restaurants, groceries and churches that I know just off the top of my head on top of a group at the University of Cincinnati even though Korean isn’t offered there. Go visit and strike up a conversation, ask if they know anyone who would be willing to practice with them. Make some friends. People in general enjoy helping others, so just go out and ask.

These are just a handful of ways to find people both locally and abroad to practice your target language with. If you go look you’ll find people, it really isn’t that hard. You have absolutely no excuse for not finding someone to practice with.

Do you have any to add? Anything particular methods you’ve found to be more or less effective? Share them with everyone in the comments.

Photo Credit: Stian Eikeland

Adam is a former English teacher turned personal trainer and writer. He’s addicted to learning, parkour and martial arts. In addition to being a voracious bibliophile Adam’s fascinated by anything related to health, fitness and language. When not studying or training he can usually be found curled up with a good piece of fiction. You can e-mail Adam at Adam@RoadtoEpic.com

  • Jim Ara

    I wanted to engage with a site wherein I can practice my conversational skills and chatting with native English speakers. So, I enrolled my self on an online personal tutoring via http://preply.com/en/skype/english-native-speakers. The experience was very nice. The tutor was very friendly and I never felt an uncomfortable moment in each teaching session. And very affordable, too! Very great job!

    • Skype definitely makes it easy to connect with people and hold tutoring sessions. Glad you could find a tutor that you really like! I know I’ve enjoyed all my experiences with language exchanges and direct tutoring via iTalki as well.