How to Stay Productive with Block Schedules

Blocks (explored) by Matthias Rhomberg

Block scheduling has proven to be the most effective to keep me on track without causing too much pain.

For the longest time, I found myself stuck in a bit of a quandary.

On one hand I really needed a schedule to keep me on track. Call it ADHD, general flightiness, whimsy capriciousness, whatever – if I didn’t have a schedule keeping me on track I would derail and do a thousand different things that weren’t actually the things I needed to do that day.

On the other hand when I created a rigid schedule for myself, like the kind that Caroline uses so well to keep herself on track, I chafed under its oppressive rule. It was nice to have something to keep me doing what I needed to be doing right then, but instinctive defiance of authority is a severe character flaw in me and it drove me mad.

So how do you compromise having enough structure to keep me on track but still allowing enough freedom to stop my instinctive rebelliousness from manifesting? Block scheduling.

Linear Scheduling vs. Block Scheduling

Block scheduling isn’t complicated, but it’s still easiest to explain it in contrast to a more traditional linear scheduling system.

Linear scheduling is what most people would probably think of as a schedule. Each task for the day or appointment or whatever is mapped out to a specific time slot. If you think of putting things in on your Google calendar or whatever that’s what a linear schedule looks like. Here’s an example of what one might look like for one of our days:

  • 6 a.m. – Wake up & make coffee

  • 6:15 a.m. – Meditate

  • 6:45 a.m. – Memrise

  • 7 a.m. – Lift

  • 8 a.m. – Shower

  • 8:30 a.m. – Daily Prep / Writing

  • 10 a.m. – Teach at Wik Academy

  • 11:30 a.m. – Eat

  • Noon – Walk with dog

  • 1 p.m. – Practice an instrument

  • 2 p.m. – Write

  • 4:30 p.m. – Eat

  • 5:30 – Teach at Wik Academy

  • 8:30 – Eat

  • 9 p.m. – Language study

  • 10 p.m. – Read, go to sleep

This is just a basic outline, not every day looks quite the same, but that is a good example of a linear schedule. Every section of the day is devoted to one or two tasks. It’s certainly fantastic for keeping a person on track and some people do very well with this type of schedule. I don’t.

I find it too repressive, personally. Some days I may feel like writing at times outside the time I have reserved for it, or may feel like moving other things around. There’s certainly room for flexibility in a schedule like this, but over time I found I moved things around so much and so frequently the schedule was rendered effectively useless.

I’ve since switched to block scheduling, which looks something like this:

  • 6 a.m. to Noon – Meditate, Memrise, Lift, Coffee, Shower, Write, Teach at WAMA, Eat

  • Noon to 4 p.m. – Walk, Write, Instrument practice, Play

  • 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. – Teach at WAMA, Language study, Eat, Write

  • 10 p.m. on – Relax, Read, Sleep

The block schedule contains all the same tasks in a general sense, but just less rigidly tied to a specific timeslot. If, in my 6 a.m. to Noon block for example, I want to save meditation for closer to noon and get to writing as soon as I get up then that’s not a problem. It provides the skeleton of a structure for the day but doesn’t flesh it out enough to feel extremely restrictive. I can have the small bit of guidance to keep me in line without feeling bound to doing certain things exactly when I’m told.

Why Not a To-Do List?

In looking at my general problems with a rigid schedule you may ask, “Why not just not schedule anything at all, but use your daily to-do list to make sure you do all the things you need to do for the day (writing, meditation, Memrise, etc.) while retaining the freedom to do them when you want?”

That certainly may be a viable option for others who have found that a strict schedule is just too rigid of a structure for them to follow comfortably. I tried it as well, and for me it just didn’t work out.

The primary issue for me was that it just wasn’t enough structure to make sure I was good about managing my energy well. I had a severely bad habit of putting things on my to-do list off until I got overwhelmed by things, or underestimating the available time I had to complete tasks and spending too much time on leisure, video games, and things like that and then realizing that I’d burned the day away without getting to the important stuff.

I’ve instituted other fail-safes to compensate for my bad habits and, to be fair, I think I could likely make that system work now. With them though, and for anyone else out there who falls victim to similar habits, the block schedule was just enough to keep me in line. It served as a loosely organized daily to-do list, reminding me that during this block I needed to get these few things done and then I could have my leisure time.

I encourage you to play around with a few different options for a week or two at a time to see what allows you to be the most productive while still giving you the highest comfort level available. Not everything that works for me will fit everyone. Caroline, for example, does best with a super rigid schedule. The key is to find what works for you.

Do you have any suggestions for ways to make the block scheduling better? Things that have worked for you that others might find useful? Share them in the comments!

Photo Credit: Matthias Rhomberg

Adam is a former English teacher turned personal trainer and writer. He’s addicted to learning, parkour and martial arts. In addition to being a voracious bibliophile Adam’s fascinated by anything related to health, fitness and language. When not studying or training he can usually be found curled up with a good piece of fiction. You can e-mail Adam at Adam@RoadtoEpic.com