Retain Holiday Peace Through One Second Meditation

Buddha Dog by SuperFantastic

This dog clearly knows how it’s done.

The holidays are stressful.

Whether it’s fighting through the grocery store the day before Thanksgiving trying to find the last few ingredients on your list, having to listen to a semi-inebriated rant by that one relative whose ideas on equality hail from a time when the phrase ‘coloreds only’ didn’t necessarily mean you were doing laundry or dealing with the near anarchy of a major retailer on Black Friday – it helps to have some way to maintain your centeredness. When you factor in all the horrible physical side effects of stress not having some way to deal with it all may genuinely be killing you.

Thankfully, one moment meditation is an easy technique you can use at any time anywhere to regain a little bit of your inner peace.

Learning to Meditate

The first step is learning to meditate. If you don’t know how yet, go check out our beginner’s guide to meditation first. If the turkey’s in the oven and the relatives are banging on the door already and you seriously need the TL;DR version here you go, meditation in 3 easy steps:

  • Step 1: Close Your Eyes – Not necessary once you’re used to meditating, but it helps if you’re a beginner.

  • Step 2: Focus On Your Breathing and Nothing Else – Put all your attention on breathing in, and breathing out. Other thoughts will pop into your head, ‘Am I doing it right?’, ‘What should I have for dinner tonight?’, ‘Boy, it’s dark with my eyes closed’, but you need to acknowledge their presence and then let them float away. Don’t try to fight it, that’s like trying to read this sentence without picturing a pink elephant, just accept them and then let them continue on their way.

    If it helps you can create a mental cue to signal the brushing away of unnecessary thoughts. This can be as esoteric sounding as the stereotypical ‘ommm’ sound or you can just say ‘hmm’ to yourself and let go of the thought.

  • Step 3: Be Empty – Eventually, the thoughts will taper off and stop pestering you and you’ll be left with an entirely empty mind focused completely on your breathing. Congratulations! You’re meditating! Remember this feeling.

Once you understand how to meditate, it’s time to compress the time you need to do it down to as small a period as possible.

Meditating in a Moment

Once you’re comfortable meditating for longer periods of time, say five to ten minutes, start practicing reducing that time by setting progressively shorter timers. It’s easiest to start with a minute and then cut down from there. Set a timer and meditate for a single minute. Focus on using your mental cue to brush those nagging thoughts away.

Next time set a timer for 45 seconds once you’ve got that down. Then set one for 30 seconds and then for 15. Below that there’s really no point in setting a timer. You likely also won’t have time to have thoughts pop up, so the real goal of meditating in a moment is brushing out all the clutter in your head right that moment to let a breath of fresh air in.

As a result of a moment being such an immeasurable, transient thing just focus on using your cue to empty your mind. Close your eyes for a second, take a deep breath and go ‘omm’ or ‘hmm’ or whatever. As you do, smile and breathe out all the thoughts that were occupying your head.

There you go, you just meditated in a single moment.

When to Take Momentary Meditation Breaks

Honestly, whenever you’re stressed.

It doesn’t just have to be through the holidays, this is a skill that will serve you well forever. Anytime you feel stress getting the best of you, close your eyes for a second and empty your mind. Anytime you find yourself getting really angry over something, use your mental cue and exhale all of that away. You can even use it when you’re feeling nervous or worried about something and need to calm down a bit.

Once you’re used to the technique you can even use it in times when you’re not stressed or anything but just need a small moment of clarity, maybe when you’re working on a project or experience writer’s block. Even when you’re just trying to get some sleep and your mind won’t quiet down, a moment of meditation can silence all those buzzing thoughts keeping you awake.

Have you used super-compressed meditation in order to get you through stressful situations or ride out a wave of anger? Do you have any tips that would make the process easier to learn or implement? Share your experiences with us in the comments!

Photo Credit: Bruce

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Adam is a linguist and personal trainer living in Cincinnati with his wife Caroline and dog Bailey. He's addicted to all things related to language, parkour, fitness and martial arts. You can contact Adam at Adam@RoadToEpic.com, on Twitter or on Google Plus.