Is Your Inner Monologue Helping or Hurting Your Success? Four Ways to Change Your Mindset and Be More Positive

The Mighty Hunter by James M. Turley

“Thoughts become things.” – Buddha

Before you begin a task or attempt to learn something new, does it make sense to first insult yourself or the subject? To tell yourself that it’s hard or you aren’t smart enough to do it?

It’s not intentional, but often people do it anyway. It’s forgivable – our brains do appear to be wired for negativity, or we remember negative experiences more often than positive ones. However, it’s not inexcusable forever. As soon as you want to do something new or need to gain a new skill, your mindset and how you approach it can have a huge impact on whether or not you will succeed.

Sometimes it’s a memory from childhood (negative emotions around something you had a bad experience with coming back to haunt you) or a cultural negativity toward a subject (X language is HARD!) or a simple fear of failure. There’s lots of ways negativity infects our thoughts and impacts our performance and ability to learn new things.

To make matters worse these negative thoughts not only hurt your chances of success, they also increase your stress levels which leads to, among many things, elevated cortisol, decreased memory, weight gain (or difficulty losing) and disrupted sleep. You are pretty much screwed. Except that you’re not.

The more you allow these negative thoughts to seep into your brain, the more you become them. It’s a self-fulfilling prophesy, so-to-speak. But you can break this negative mindset and instead retrain yourself to think positively. Vain affirmations not necessary.

Four Ways to Change Your Mindset and Be More Positive

1. Practice Mindfulness

Being mindful is to pay attention to the present moment without judgment, or “living in the now.” When you are mindful you are focused on the task at hand – not distracted by other things or, worse, past experiences or worrying about the future. In other words, practicing mindfulness allows you to be more balanced and positive which will then enhance your mental performance.

So how can you practice being more mindful? You can start meditating daily or, if you prefer moving meditation give that a try. By taking breaks to clear your mind, doing one thing at a time and being slow and deliberate about it and paying attention to your thoughts to prohibit worrying about the past or future you will slowly build the habit of mindfulness.

Want another reason to practice mindfulness? There is some evidence that being mindful can increase the gray matter in the brain’s hippocampus, an area of the brain important for learning, memory and emotion, while also reducing gray matter in the amygdala, an area of the brain associated with stress and anxiety.

2. Redefine Failure

“Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently.” – Henry Ford

Have you failed yet today?

Changing your attitude toward failure can go a long way to giving you a more positive attitude and getting rid of negative thinking. Don’t treat your failures as something to be ashamed of, be proud of them! Through your failures you not only learn, but you also grow in your experience and insights.

If a fear of failure is preventing you from even beginning to take action, take a closer look at it. What will happen if you fail? What are the possible scenarios? How can you prevent the worst? And, most importantly, if the worst happens anyway, is it the end of the world?

The answer to that last one is that, more likely than not, it wont be the end of the world. Like Henry Ford was getting at, you need to remind yourself that when you do fail that the world isn’t over; You can still take action, or get back up and try again, this time a little wiser than you were before.

Not convinced? Need more reasons to go fail? We recently posted an article just on Why You Need to Go Out And Fail.

3. Be Diligent

When you are studying Chinese grammar you can complain about how hard it is or you can, using smart techniques, keep working on it bit by bit every day.

If you are taking on a huge project it can get overwhelming and a little voice in the back of your head might start telling you that it’s impossible to complete. The negatives thoughts can paralyze you – if you let them.

When those negative thoughts creep into your head take a moment to refocus, take a break if you need to. Divide the huge task into small, manageable chunks and have some way to positively reward yourself when you have completed your smaller goals, preferably with something like a nice green check mark on a calendar to indicate your progress and success.

Over time, the small successes build up and not only boost your overall optimism and positivity toward that particular goal, but you will be able to apply these same principles toward other goals you take on.

4. Take Control

Taking control is probably the most important of all of these lessons. Positive people don’t just have a good day, and success doesn’t just happen by accident – they make these things happen.

One of the causes of stress and self-directed negativity are hopes and wishes lacking action. Being passive won’t get you closer to your goals and most certainly won’t bring you success. Be pro-active and actively work toward success, whatever that may look like for you. Whether it’s constructing your ideal life, being able to speak another language, starting a business or getting healthier.

You have control over your actions and reactions – you have a choice. The more you are passive about goals and creating systems and situations that move you closer to success, the wider the gap gets between you and positivity and success.

I know it’s ridiculous to just expect everyone to suddenly change their actions, but it’s not ridiculous to suggest that you make it a habit. By combining the above advice about mindfulness with the goal of taking more control, you can slowly build this into a habit. Be mindful, take note of negative or passive thoughts and actions, and build the habit of changing them into action and positivity.

Being positive is ultimately about mindful action and re-framing typically negative situations like failure.

Have you struggled with negative thoughts? What has or hasn’t worked for you? Tell us what you think in the comments below.

Photo Credit: James M. Turley

3 Reasons You Should Wake Up Early and How to Actually Do It

Good Morning by Frank Wuestefeld

Seeing the Sun rise is just one of the perks of waking up early.

I have never in my life been an early riser.

In fact I was quite the opposite – a quintessential night owl who was more likely to be heading to bed when most others would be waking up. On top of that when you did finally wake me up I was generally grumpy, malicious and horrible to be around. For the first few hours I’d shuffle around filled with hate for everything until I woke up all the way.

That is until recently, when I finally made the transition to being able to wake up early and actually feel happy and energized.

Now I love waking up early. So what are the benefits to getting up early instead of sleeping in late?

Reasons to Wake Early

  • Increased Productivity – Waking up early allows for you to get substantially more done, both in that it affords you a lot of additional productive time and in that it gives you the time each morning to plan out the remainder of your day in such a way as to be as productive as possible. I know I can get more done in the morning between when I wake up and when I head into the gym to train clients than many people get done in their entire day – and I get my to-do list in order and my most important tasks for the day selected so that productivity echoes throughout the remainder of my day.

    Now, it may not seem like it would really allow you to be that much more productive since you aren’t really gaining any additional time. You still need as much sleep, so part of waking up earlier is going to sleep earlier. Your number of waking hours really shouldn’t change. So if we aren’t gaining more time, aren’t we just changing when we’re productive from later to earlier? How does that translate to more productivity?

    The trick is in the timing of things. Productivity is a lot like boiling water – it takes a lot more energy to start the water boiling than it does to keep it boiling. In other words, the toughest part about being productive is the very start of being productive. Taking care of that earlier in the morning lays the foundation for you to coast on that momentum the rest of the day. On top of that, it’s a lot easier to get distracted or run out of steam in the evening and just say, “Screw it I’ll do it tomorrow.”

    Just like how you should take care of your most important tasks for the day first to ensure you get them done, you should focus on being productive first so that you guarantee you get what you need to do done.

  • Less Stress – One of the biggest benefits I’ve noticed is that I no longer spend the majority of my mornings stressed to my limit and on the verge of murdering someone. It used to be I’d roll out of bed filled with hate with barely enough time to get ready and into work. I’d shuffle in clearly having just rolled out of bed four or five minutes late in the mood to tear the head off anyone who gave me a good excuse. If I’d ran out the door without time to finish my coffee, it was even worse.

    Essentially, I started out every morning stressed and annoyed. Can you imagine the kind of effect that had on the rest of my day?

    Not only did that mood ripple through the rest of everything I did that day but it meant by the time I was home after work I just felt wrecked. I had gone through such a stressful morning each day that I didn’t want to do anything in the evening but relax – not exactly conducive to getting anything important done. Add to that the cortisol and all the other physiological effects of all that stress and you have a recipe for a lot of compounding problems.

    Getting up early means I have plenty of time to have a cup of coffee (or too) get ready at my leisure and get some things done. I even have some time to do things I enjoy before I head in to work, like reading, meditating and exercise. That means when I do arrive at work in the morning I get there early and in a bright, cheerful mood that would’ve made the former me want to punch the current me in the teeth.

    Much like being stressed out and angry set the tone for the rest of my day previously, being in a good mood tends to carry me throughout the rest of the day making each day fun and productive.

  • Serenity – Just like your mood in the previous section impacts the remainder of your day in a strong way, your environment at the start of your day can set tones that will stay with you, if not for the rest of the day then for a substantial part of it. Starting your day peacefully in the calm of the early morning quiet sets you up for a much more relaxed day than leaping out of bed and dashing to the car with mismatched socks on and burnt toast jammed in your mouth.

    At the risk of waxing poetic there’s a serene, meditative quality to the time before the majority of the world has woken that is unique. Going for a walk in the near silence of dawn as you watch the Sun rise is an amazing and incomparable experience and, even if for some reason it doesn’t contribute to making your day better, it will contribute to making your life better.

How to Actually Wake Up Early

Learning to wake up early can be a bit difficult. I certainly didn’t have an easy time of it – it was a huge struggle and something that I’m still a little surprised I pulled off. If I can do it though, anyone can. Here are the biggest things that I found to be instrumental in making the switch from night owl to early bird.

  • Moving the Alarm Clock – I have a severely unhealthy obsession with the snooze button. If I can, I will always snooze. It is a tragic flaw of mine. As a result of that I find the snooze button to be one of the most damnable inventions ever to plague mankind and I sincerely hope whomever invented it was set on fire and torn apart by alligators.

    The snooze button serves no purpose but to ruin your day with false promises. Like some sinister drug pusher it snares you at your most vulnerable by tempting you with more sleep at a time when your dream addled brain is most likely to be craving just that. It promises to quiet that shrieking alarm clock and allow you a bit more sleep. It never seems that bad either – just five more minutes. That’s all. It won’t hurt.

    But it’s never just five more minutes, is it? Five turns into ten, then twenty, then thirty, and before you know it you realize you needed to be showered, fed and out the door ten minutes ago and your whole morning is screwed. The worst part? You’re not going to feel more rested after 5 more minutes of sleep. No one ever woke up feeling crappy, hit snooze and shut their eyes for five minutes, then reopened them feeling rested and energized. The snooze button tempts you at your weakest with a siren song of false promises that it can’t even deliver on and then ruins your whole day.

    So how do you resist the sinister silver-tongued snooze button? One way is to put your alarm clock as far from you as you possibly can without reducing its effectiveness in waking you up. That forces you to get up out of bed to turn it off, and once you’re up and moving around the temptation of five more minutes of sweet slumber is much easier to resist. If you find that’s not enough, or for some reason your situation makes it impossible to get your alarm far enough away to force you out of bed, make it a rule that you must leave the bedroom for something immediately after shutting off the alarm.

    This can be to get a glass of water, use the restroom, do some jumping jacks, whatever – the point is to get you away from your bed long enough to escape the mental fog present that clings to you following your escape from dreamland. Once that’s been dealt with you’ll find it much easier to resist the urge to return to bed and you can get on with your day.

  • Get to Sleep On Time – If you’re trying to get up at 5 a.m. you’re going to have a much, much harder time of it if you’re going to sleep at 1 a.m. than if you’re asleep by 10 p.m.

    Waking up early isn’t about reducing the total number of hours you’re sleeping. Not getting enough sleep will cause a ton of health problems. I can’t overstate how much you need 7 to 8 hours of sleep. With that being the case if you’re going to push your waking time to earlier then you need to push your sleeping time to earlier too.

    If you’re having trouble getting to sleep on time there are a handful of things you can do. The first is to limit your expose to electronics and media long enough before bedtime to allow your mind to wind down. You should also begin limiting your exposure to light about an hour or so before you want to go to sleep in order to encourage your body to begin producing melatonin.

    Reading before bed is a good option as a way to wind down a bit, but I would recommend reading on a physical book if you can. Now, we’ve pretty much gotten rid of all our books, so if you have to I recommend at least reading in the dark with the brightness on your device turned low enough so as to not be too hard on your eyes.

    Exercise in general will help you get to sleep easier as well, though some people have issues with exercising before bed. Some people it winds down, other people it keys up – figure out which one you are before committing to lots of exercise right before bed.

  • Do Things Gradually – Don’t try to go from waking up at 8 a.m. to waking up at 6 a.m. in one go. That’s too much of a change to throw on yourself all at once. You may do it once or twice but in the end you’re setting yourself up for failure. You’re just going to get discouraged when you eventually fail and then give up.

    Instead, make the change as gradual as possible. Wake up five or ten minutes earlier each day, or each couple days even if it’s a bit harder to adjust, until you get down to the time you want to be waking up at. Each successive success at waking up on time will make you feel a little more confident that you can do it and before long you’ll be at your goal.

    The change each time doesn’t have to be drastic. The point here is to go slow, so don’t push it and just let yourself adjust each time before you make the next small jump earlier a bit.

Have you tried any of these strategies to help yourself wake up earlier? Do you actually enjoy waking up earlier? Why? Let us know in the comments!

Photo Credit: Frank Wuestefeld

How to Actually Accomplish the Stuff on Your To-Do List

To-Dos by Courtney Dirks

Sure you can make a to-do list, but can you actually cross everything back off of it?

I am a man who enjoys his to-do lists.

There’s just something about getting out a physical piece of paper and a pen and actually putting the things I need to accomplish in a day down in ink that feels really good. It makes it feel like I have something concrete to work from, something to keep me on track and focused. When I make a really solid to-do list I feel like there’s absolutely no way I won’t get all of that stuff done.

And by the end of the day, I haven’t done any of it.

So what’s going on? How do you make the jump from making a great to-do list to actually doing what’s on it?

Listing Vs. Doing

To-do lists are a really effective tool, and they genuinely do contribute to helping you accomplish the things you need to do in a day. The problem is that there’s often a disconnect between listing things and doing things.

This disconnect, when manifested like it has in many of my to-do lists past, leads to a long string of great to-do lists that just never get done. The most frustrating part in my experience is that when you make a to-do list and then don’t actually do anything on it you still have the list as a physical representation of all the stuff you should’ve done that day but didn’t adding insult to injury.

Having quite a bit of personal experience with writing things down and then never doing them, I’ve found most often fixing the problem lies in utilizing a handful of techniques that get around the most common obstacles to completing your lists.

Timeboxing

I’ve talked about timeboxing before and for good reason – it works. If you’ve never tried timeboxing before, you essentially allot a specific duration of time to work on a task and limit yourself to that duration of time to do it. As soon as your time runs out, you stop and move on to something else. It doesn’t matter if you’ve completed your task or not – when time’s up, you’re finished.

So how does timeboxing help get around some of the obstacles that are most common in preventing people from completing their to-do lists?

  • It Gets You Started – As a personal trainer, I come across a lot of people who have a desire to get in shape and improve their health, but lack the motivation to actually do workouts at the frequency they need to in order to succeed. Whenever I have a client who struggles with not feeling like working out, I make their first goal to just come to the gym.

    I don’t tell them to workout. I don’t care if they walk in the door and then walk out. I just tell them that I’ll be looking at their visits history and as long as they scan that card to get in the days I tell them to then I’ll be happy. Everyone agrees that even if they don’t have the motivation to workout they at least can muster up enough to come over to the gym swipe a card and leave.

    What I’ve found is, even when people leave their house with the intent of checking in and leaving, once people get in the door they’re almost guaranteed to workout. Now we’re usually not talking a personal record breaking lifting session here, but they do something. In the end, that’s the important thing.

    Once you get started in a task, even if you don’t want to do it, it’s much easier to continue to work on it for a while. Much like it takes less energy to keep water boiling than it does to make it boil, it takes a lot less energy on your part to keep doing something than it does to get started. Timeboxing helps you take that first step by forcing you to choose a task and focus on it for the allotted time. Once you’re rolling most of the hard work is done.

  • It Removes Task Dread – The brilliant part about timeboxing, in my opinion, is that it sets boundaries. People respond well to boundaries.

    Imagine if you were enrolling in college, or signing the papers for a mortgage and, rather than saying you’ll be on track graduate in four years or your home loan will be repaid in fifteen years, they told you that you’ll graduate eventually, or that your home will be yours someday they guess. I don’t know about you, but I would get up and leave.

    Without an end date in sight it’s hard to justify investing those kinds of resources into something. Tasks are no different. You’re never going to start a task that seems endless.

    When something looks to be so huge that you just can’t imagine ever being able to actually finish it, maybe cleaning out the garage for the first time in 8 years for example, it makes it so daunting and painful sounding that you just avoid it.

    Timeboxing removes that apprehension by placing boundaries on the task. Rather than, “I am faced with the endless task of cleaning the Augean stable is my garage,” it’s “Yeah, I’ll clean for an hour and then be done.”

    The second is a lot less painful sounding, and it gets you started which will lead to the momentum to keep going. I should note though that even if you get really into it, stick to your boundaries. Even if you really get into it and are rocking things out, stop at that hour mark. If you don’t, you’ll start eroding your trust in your own boundaries and it may make it more difficult to get started next time.

  • It Forces You to Take Breaks – Taking breaks has huge psychological benefits. Not only does it help you refocus, but it also keeps you from falling into a repetitive mode of thinking and getting bored with whatever you’re doing. Best of all, by not getting bored and by having a scheduled break to look forward to, it’ll keep you from giving in to the temptation of time sinks like Facebook.

    Since timeboxing restricts how long you can work on something, it forces you to take little breaks between tasks. After the break you can switch tasks or do another block of the same task – either way you’ve had five to ten minutes in between to stretch out, get your social media fix and let your mind wander.

    It may not seem like much, but all those things will make a huge difference not only in how easily you accomplish your tasks, but also your creativity and focus as well.

  • It Eliminates Multi-Tasking – Much in the way that breaks are good, multi-tasking is bad. As Ron Swanson would say, “Don’t half-ass two things, whole-ass one thing.”

    Multi-tasking can be seductive because it makes it feel like we’re getting more done when really we’re just doing less and more poorly at that. Doing one thing and doing it well is a much better way to go about things. Timeboxing reinforces that by limiting you to a single task for your allotted time. When you’ve only got an hour to do as much as you can on a task or finish it, you don’t have time to multi-task. You have to focus on whatever it is you need to be doing right then and that means you’ll be able to work a lot better and more efficiently.

Making Good To-Do Lists

Sometimes it’s not that you’re having trouble getting your list done, but rather that you’ve gone and made a really crappy to-do list.

That’s alright – I used to make tons of them.

The two biggest things I see when it comes to poorly constructed to-do lists are overloading it with way too many tasks and, possibly even worse, not including fun tasks.

When your to-do list has 400 things on it, you’re just setting yourself up to fail. Overloading yourself and then having to face the shame of an uncompleted to-do list at the end of the day is not the way to be productive. Instead, limit yourself to a smaller number of tasks that you know you’ll have the time for. Even better, pick a few out of those limited tasks to be designated as your most important tasks for the day and make sure they get done first. That way, even if something gets in the way and you don’t finish your list, you can still feel good about getting the most important things done.

On that note, reading your to-do list should not feel like reading your jail sentence. If you wake up in the morning already annoyed at how terrible your day is going to be because of all the painful stuff on this horrendous to-do list you have to do – then you’re just going to be miserable all day and likely not get any of it done anyway.

Always put some fun stuff on your to do list. Preferably fun productive stuff, but just something fun and relaxing. Having something to look forward to will make a big difference in how you feel and your success rate in actually getting your lists completed.

Do you have any other suggestions for getting things done? Have you used timeboxing before and, if so, what did you think? Tell us in the comments!

Photo Credit: Courtney Dirks

The 330 Day Productivity Challenge

Prague Orloj by Luca Gennari

330 days of consistent productivity – can I pull it off?

It’s been a while since I’ve put myself up for any kinds of challenges so I decided recently that I was way overdue for one. The problem was, I wasn’t sure what kind of challenge I should take.

On top of that, things have been kind of crazy lately and my normal writing schedule has been completely obliterated. As a result I have a huge backlog of articles I’ve been wanting to write and publish, but haven’t been able to actually sit down and take care of all of them. Additionally having recently wrecked one of my ankles in a bad landing while practicing vaults, I’ve been struggling to get my old mobility back now that it’s finished healing.

As a result I’ve decided to make this latest challenge all about productivity.

Specifically long term productivity.

Tortoise or Hare?

In general when it comes to productivity styles there tend to be two categories of people – tortoises and hares.

Like the fable I’m borrowing the titles from, tortoises take things slow and gradually. They focus on consistency of work over quantity of work. They’re less concerned with getting a lot done right now than they are with getting a little done at a time that will eventually accumulate into a large volume of work. Tortoises tend to not have a lot to show for their work at the outset, but wind up with a lot in the end.

Tortoises are marathoners.

Hares work the opposite way. Rather than focus on taking things slow and gradually they like to work fast and frenetically. They focus on insane bursts of super-productivity followed by stretches of repose – quantity of work done in a specific period of time is more important than working consistently. After a productive period a Hare will often have a large volume of work to show for their effort but will then take a long break where they don’t get much if anything done.

Hares are sprinters.

Now, I don’t honestly think there is any inherent advantage of one approach over the other. There are advantages and disadvantages to each.

Personally I have always been a hare. My habits when it comes to productivity are to go a long stretch where I just don’t get anything done. I feel out of it. Uninspired and entirely devoid of motivation. Then, out of nowhere, in a manic burst productive fervor I will destroy a week’s worth of tasks all at once. I’m the kind of person who goes two weeks without doing any work and then in one coffee fueled frenzy writes ten thousand words. I’m the kind of person who will stay up until 4 a.m. because I’m so fired up I can’t sleep until I finish whatever I’m working on.

I wrote my 34,000 word graduate thesis in 5 days. We’d had roughly six months to work on it, and I basically did nothing until that last week, at which point I went into a sleep deprived, hyper-caffeinated, cloistered work mode and got the whole thing done. I’ll have you know I got an A on it too.

In writing this, describing the peaks and valleys of my surges of productivity, it occurs to me it sounds a little like I have some kind of psychological problem. I guess that’s something to worry about another time.

So what’s the point of this tortoise and hare business?

Changing Teams

Like I said I don’t think there’s anything inherently better or worse about either modality. Unlike the original fable in real life there are times when it’s more beneficial to be a tortoise and times when the advantage is the hare’s.

That being said, I have noticed that a pretty large number of successful people tend to be tortoises rather than hares. I also realized that, there being advantages and disadvantages to each, the best possible state to be in would be one where you could switch from one method to the other as the situation dictates.

That’s how this latest challenge was born.

As I said, I am a dyed in the wool hare. (Died in the fur? Whatever)

I think it would be extremely beneficial to me to train myself to embrace tortoise-hood in order to learn how to change from one way to another whensoever the situation I’m in predicates an advantage of one over the other. So I’m going to work to become a tortoise.

The Challenge Goals

The bread and butter of tortoise style productivity is an extremely long stretch of consistent productivity over the manic bursts I’m accustomed to.

That being the goal, rather than set a hard number of things to accomplish which would tempt me to work ahead in bursts and then take some time off I’m going to make my goal to perform certain actions every single day. I’ve done 30 day challenges similar to this in the past, but 30 days has never been long enough to actually force any kind of change in my behavior or habits.

So I’m turning it up to 11.

Rather than 30 days my challenge is to go for 330 days without missing a single day of productivity. Specifically, in order to target a handful of areas I particularly want to work on, my challenge will be to:

  • Write One Article Per Day for 330 Days

  • Mobilize My Ankle for 4 Minutes Per Day for 330 Days

  • Learn 15 New Words Per Day for 330 Days

I’ll write a post about how I intend to tackle this challenge tomorrow when I begin it, but those are the goals I’m shooting for. Ideally by the end of it I’ll have spent enough time in a consistent productive mode that I’ll finally be habituated to it and will be able to switch back and forth from one method to another.

What do you think? Can I do it or am I just setting myself up for failure? Have you ever tried doing something consistently for close to a year? How did it go? Any productivity tortoises out there want to share some tips? Let us know in the comments!

Photo Credit: Luca Gennari

Using the New Memrise App to Learn Everywhere

Memrise Logo

Memrise’s new free app means you can learn efficiently anywhere. Except the bathroom – that’s weird.

To say that I am a big fan of learning would be a monumental understatement. I really think continued learning is one of the most important things you can do with your life.

That dedication to always learning new things means that when new tools come up to make it easier or more efficient I am all over them. The latest of those is the free app out now from Memrise – and it is fantastic.

Best of all when used properly you can learn a substantial amount of information with a fairly minimal time investment and not even feel like you’ve studied.

Enter the Memrise App

I’ve been a big fan of the Memrise site for a long time now. If you’ve never used it, it’s basically a community driven Spaced Repetition System (SRS) learning tool that comes with user generated memory hooks (‘Mems’ as Memrise calls them) already built in for you. Along with Anki it’s my favorite way to memorize large volumes of information, like target language vocabulary for instance, permanently. Right now Memrise and the associated app are both free, although there are plans to have paid courses in the future.

Previously, the single flaw I really found with Memrise was the fact that there really wasn’t a good way to make it mobile. They had a beta app out but it really wasn’t the same – you could also pull the site up in the mobile browser but it was honestly a bit of a pain to use that way. I don’t mind sitting down and putting an hour in doing my reps on Memrise, but I think SRS tools really shine when you can use them in your downtime.

That’s all been fixed by their new app.

The free Memrise app syncs with your account on the website so that all of the courses you’re subscribed to are available on your phone. The interface works perfectly, and all of the really large courses I’ve subscribed to load quickly. It even gives you the option of downloading the courses to your phone so that when off wi-fi you don’t burn through all your plan’s data usage.

How to Use the Memrise App Efficiently

In my opinion where the Memrise app really shines is as the perfect way to make little chunks of inevitable downtime extremely useful. Since – if you’re like me – your phone goes with you everywhere, you can study everywhere. Combine this with the fact that the heart and soul of SRS is small chunks of spaced out study rather than large sessions and it makes for a perfect opportunity for learning.

Every time you have a few moments – waiting for a bus, standing in line, waiting to be seated at a restaurant, etc. you can pull out your phone and learn or reinforce five or six new vocab words. There are lots and lots of these little chunks of dead time each day, and over the course of a month it adds up to hours and hours of study time. The best part is, you don’t feel like you’ve actually studied, you just realize one day that you know a ton more vocab than you did a couple weeks ago.

Let’s face it, you’re going to pull out your phone during these times anyway, why not personally benefit from it?

A good trick I’ve found is that I made it a rule that I have to do one round on Memrise before I can open Facebook, Twitter or my E-mail on my phone. I don’t think I’m alone in admitting that I do this compulsively, so it makes for a lot of opportunities to learn. Best of all, the courses are broken into small manageable chunks which are further broken into small learning sessions. Each session takes me 30 seconds to a minute to complete so I’m really not inconvenienced at all by doing it before I get to whatever I was originally going to do on my phone.

You can find Memrise on the Apple App Store for iPhone and on Google Play for Android.

Have you tried out the Memrise app? What did you think? Come up with any other good tricks for getting the most out of it? Share them with us in the comments!

Photo Credit: Memrise

Identity Based Habits 101 – How to Build a Habit Forever

More Questions than Answers by An Untrained Eye

The best way to form a lasting habit is to completely re-imagine your identity.

Anyone who’s ever tried to build a new habit from scratch knows – change is difficult.

Think about it, how many times have you gotten really fired up about wanting to start something new, whether it was a new exercise program, studying a second language, writing a book or even just getting in the habit of stretching a little each morning?

As fired up as you were, how long until that initial motivation wore off and you were back to your old habits of not working out, studying, writing or whatever? For most people it’s usually not long at all. So what’s the trick to making a new habit stick if being really pumped about it initially isn’t enough?

The use of identity based habits.

What are identity based habits?

I’ve written about using identity based habits to achieve goals in the past, but in case you aren’t familiar with them the basic idea is that you can best solidify a habit by becoming the kind of person who would perform that action habitually.

Ok, that may actually sound more confusing – here’s how it works.

Without getting too much into discussions of free will, determinism and compatibilism, essentially all of your thoughts and decisions arise out of processes that begin unconsciously. In other words, while it may feel like you consciously decided to have a cup of coffee this morning in reality that decision was made well before you were aware of it by a long chain of neurological and causative factors.

In fact, studies have been done where researches hooked participants up to brain scanners and could accurately predict what the people were going to do when left alone in a room (for example, pick up a magazine, walk around, etc.) several moments before that person was aware they were going to do it. This was possible because regions of the brain the participants weren’t consciously aware of fired well before they had the ‘conscious decision’ to do what they were going to do.

Alright, so that’s kind of freaky – but what does it have to do with building habits?

Well what that demonstrates is that whether you like it or not, your decisions and behaviors really are largely if not entirely dictated by factors that exist outside of or independent of your conscious mind. In other words if you’re trying to form a new habit by sheer willpower alone, you’re already setting yourself up in a losing battle – or at least a battle over which you have very little control over the outcome.

Rather than just throw the dice and hope you roll high enough to form the habit (some D&D player somewhere is reading this and nodding), using identity based habits lets you rig the dice in your favor.

An identity based habit is formed by acting like the person you want to be until you actually become them. So, for example, if you’re currently overweight and want to get into the habit of lifting weights three times per week you would begin to think of yourself as ‘a weightlifter’ or maybe ‘an athlete’ – at the very least as ‘a fit person’.

Then, gradually, you would set yourself up to really live like you were already ‘a fit person’. You would do whatever things in your mind ‘a fit person’ does, maybe read about lifting and nutrition, talk about it with other people, and (most importantly in this case) lift regularly. Before long it become self-reinforcing and the new parts of your identity that you’ve been ‘faking’ would become part of your real identity.

In other words, by thinking of yourself as ‘a fit person’ and strongly identifying as such it becomes contrary to your nature to not go lift. Before long it will get to the point where it will feel strange to not do the very thing you’ve been struggling to make habitual.

This rigs the system by changing the environment, background causes and subconscious neurological factors that determine our choices before we are aware of them. Put simply, you’re making it hard to lose by playing a winnable game.

How to Establish Identity Based Habits

You may at this point be saying, “Ok, that makes sense, but how in the world do I just change my identity? Isn’t that as hard as changing my habits in the first place?”

Not quite as difficult, but to be fair there is some truth to it – suggesting that you should wake up tomorrow and just decide to have an entirely new identity is a lot like suggesting to someone suffering from depression to decide to cheer up – it’s not going to be that easy.

The best ways to make the transition process easier are by playing pretend and using small winnable goals to prove to yourself that you really are the kind of person who you want to be. We’ll look at playing pretend first.

Remember being young and playing make-believe? Well if you can’t try really hard because that’s exactly what we’re going to use to get your new habits to stick.

Rather than try to force yourself to genuinely believe right off the bat that you are now, say, ‘a person who can speak four languages’ rather than someone who speaks one pretend to be that person. Fake it ’til you make it, as the saying goes.

This works because in the end it doesn’t really matter if you believe it, as long as you pretend well enough to do the things the person you want to be would do, then eventually you’ll wake up one morning as that person. Using the above as an example, if you pretend like you’re the person who learns languages easily and do all the things that you imagine that kind of person would do (study up on target languages, read news in those languages, watch TV in those languages, etc.) than eventually you’ll have done so much of that you will actually be the kind of person who does those things – see how that works?

The other good way to ease into it is by using small goals as ways to prove to yourself that you can actually be the person you want to be.

By small goals I mean significant things that are still small enough to accomplish without much trouble. For example, if you want to redefine yourself as a writer you don’t want to shoot for writing a book in a week – that’s just setting yourself up to fail at which point you’ll doubt that self-image. Instead you would pick something like writing 500 words everyday. That’s maybe half a page or so.

That type of goal is achievable enough that you really have no excuse not to do it. No matter how busy you are you have the ten minutes or so per day necessary to write half a page worth of something. After a couple weeks, when you look back at all you’ve written, you can say to yourself, “Hey, look at all this I’ve accomplished. I guess I really am a writer!” Then you can kick it up a notch to 1,000 words per day or whatever the next step would be in solidifying that self-image.

Just like with faking it, before long you’ll find it just feels wrong to not write something each day. After all, you’re a writer and that’s what writer’s do. When you get to that point – congratulations, you’ve just formed a lifelong habit.

The best results will always come from not focusing on the end goal or result (I want to be fit) but instead by focusing on embracing and internalizing the process itself (I want to be the kind of person who trains regularly and eats right).

Have you ever tried to change your self-identity in order to better solidify or create a habit? How did it go? Do you have any other advice for other people who would like to try? Share it with us in the comments!

Photo Credit: An Untrained Eye

4 Quick Workout Tips for Super Busy People

Double-decker Bus Does Pushups by Michael Camilleri

I advocate doing push ups while you wait for the bus, I don’t advocate buses doing push ups.

Life is busy.

For all the same reasons you probably don’t think you’ve got time to learn a second language you may also think you haven’t got the time to spend hours every week getting fit and healthy. Now while I think most people do have some things that can prioritize around and cut from their schedule, I’m not going to say it’s as simple as cutting out TV time. Most people are genuinely busy and that can make fitting in a workout difficult.

Thankfully there are some ways that you can make it work and at least fit something in without having to sacrifice anything from your schedule.

Do What Fits Your Schedule

Even if you’re following a set program like Starting Strength or Wendler’s 5/3/1 it’s not the end of the world if you do a different workout instead that fits your schedule better that day.

Sure, if you’re consistently finding that you only have the time to do a workout from the program you’re following properly once a week, then it might be a good idea to either reevaluate your reasons for being on that program or reevaluate your schedule. If it’s just once in a while though Rippetoe is not going to hunt you down and punch you in the face.

Instead either pick a different workout that’s shorter like our 5 minute morning bodyweight workout or just do whatever you can from your normal workout in that time frame.

Even if that means only doing your warm up and your cool down that’s fine – it was something – and something is always better than doing nothing at all.

If you have a little more time you can prioritize what you do from the workout. If you’re more focused on your legs right now do your squats but leave the pressing for another day. Use the limited time you do have to hit what’s most important to you, which brings me to the next tip…

Be Efficient

If you have a very limited amount of time to get a workout in, it makes the most sense to get the most out of that short workout.

For that reason you always want to make sure to prioritize what you plan to do. Always put strength training above cardio. Gains in conditioning on the cardiovascular side of things diminish relatively quickly when you go for a period of time with no training. Gains on the strength side of things however last much longer when you have some time off and in fact can even be benefited by taking breaks. It makes a lot more sense then if you have a chaotic or busy schedule to not worry so much about the cardio side of things and to prioritize strength training.

Within the strength training you should always prioritize what you’ll get the most benefit from for your particular goals. If you have a sport or activity you really love or are actually training for, hit the most used muscle groups for it and leave the less used ones for another time. Alternatively you can hit whatever area needs the most work or feels the most recovered from the last workout.

Everyone’s prioritization is going to differ based on their goals – the important thing it to put the thought into prioritizing first.

A related option for prioritization is to do whatever exercise you enjoy the most. If you hate push ups, pick them as the thing to drop and leave in what you enjoy. Choosing to do what you consider fun will ensure you enjoy your brief workout and aren’t tempted to come up with excuses to skip it. That ties in to our next piece of advice…

Have Fun and Go Play

I think most people, if they had only 20 minutes of free time in a day, would rather do something fun than workout. Part of the problem here is that most people don’t find working out as fun as I do, but the other problem is that they think it’s one or the other – you can have fun and work out at the same time.

While it’s certainly true that a well-planned and structured fitness program is the best way to get you to your particular fitness goals for most people any kind of physical activity is a serious improvement from that they normally do.

So just go play.

Chase your dog around the park, race your kids, grab a handful of friends and play a pick-up game of something, go try out parkour. There are countless options.

Don’t really feel like doing that upper body workout today? When was the last time you climbed a tree? Not in the mood for those interval sprints? See who can get to the tennis ball faster, you or your dog. Anything that you really enjoy that gets you moving not only gets you a little bit of exercise, but it also makes sure you won’t hate it and fight to come up with excuses why you can’t do it.

Weave Exercise into Your Routine

I understand that for some people their schedule is so tight that even all of these options may not work, particularly if they’re struggling to find even a short chunk of time to get away and have a quick workout. Even if you fall into that category, there are options.

If you really don’t have 10 to 15 minutes in one single block for some quick activity then weave it into your day.

There are tons of things you can do both while you’re working on other things or during the hundreds of minutes each day you inevitably spend waiting on something.

If you sit all day consider switching to a standing desk. Every time you’re waiting for something to load on your computer hop up and do push ups until it loads. Do dips on the handrail of the elevator as you ride it up to your office or take the stairs and lunge your way up them. Hop down on the floor and see if you can hold a plank for the entire duration of the commercial break. Rock out some bodyweight squats while you wait for the bus.

There are countless options. The point is to just always be present in the moment with with whatever you’re doing and asking yourself, “Could I be exercising while I do this?”

These are just a few of our best quick tips for fitting some fitness time into a packed schedule, but there are lots more. I want to hear from all the other busy people – do you have any things you do that help you stay fit even when you’re super busy? Share them with everyone in the comments!

Photo Credit: Michael Camilleri

Easy Ways to Maximize Limited Language Learning Time

Hangul by Chita21

It’s a fact of life – most people are busy.

You’ve got a full time job or school to worry about, possibly a family to take care of, and countless other responsibilities. Not everyone wants to spend their downtime studying either, you need a little time to relax and have fun too.

When you add all of that up, there isn’t always a lot of time left for learning a new language. If you’re living in a country that primarily speaks the language you’re learning it’s not as much of an obstacle, but not everyone has that luxury. Thankfully there are some tips and tactics you can use to get the most out of both the limited time you can dedicate to practice and all the downtime you’ve got throughout the day.

Optimizing Learning Time

First we’ll look at some things you can do to optimize the time you can specifically devote to studying your target language. A lot of these have to do with making sure you’re as focused and productive as possible.

  • Have A Plan – Don’t go into a study session not really knowing what your goal is for that session. Studying without a goal almost always leads to aimless screwing around and that’s almost never productive. Instead, go into each study session with a plan not only for what your specific goal for that study session is but also with a game plan for how you’re going to work toward or reach that goal during that session. It can be as simple as ‘Memorize these 20 new words’ or as complicated as ‘Be able to write a poem in my target language’, the important thing is to have a goal.
  • Eliminate Distractions – If you have an hour set aside to study, use that entire hour to study. Do not check Facebook, do not watch TV, do not listen to music, do not get distracted by texts from friends or check your RSS or go read blogs (even this one). You can use a program like Rescue Time or Freedom to shut off your Internet temporarily if you’re not using it to access your materials. If you have to just download everything you need or print it out then turn your phone off and rip out your modem – you’ve dedicated this time to studying and damnit, you’re going to spend that time studying.
  • Take Controlled Breaks – I know, I know I just told you to buckle down and study for the time you allotted, and you should, but you should also take a controlled five minute break every 20 minutes or so. It turns out we tend to remember things better the closer they are to the beginning and ending of our study sessions. By taking a very short break every 20 minutes or so you can maximize your recall from the study session much more than if you sat there and studied for an hour straight. This is not free license to give into distractions and goof off. Your breaks should be no more than 5 minutes and they should be something that you’re not going to get sucked into. That means yes to getting up and stretching, walking around or doing some push ups and no to checking Facebook, your e-mail or just about anything online.

Optimizing Downtime

So now you know how to get the most out of your structured study sessions, but what if you don’t have the time to have structured study sessions. My first question would be ‘How much time do spend watching TV every night?’. Even excluding that, there are thousands of little moments of downtime each day, times when you’re waiting on something or not doing anything, that you can add up into a substantial amount of study time.

  • Master Passive Learning – Just because you can’t go live in a country that speaks your target language doesn’t mean you can’t master passive, immersive learning by building your own language bubble. When you’re in the car, at the gym or anywhere else you can have your headphones in or music playing listen to dialogues in your target language that you’ve selected or listen to music in your target language. Label everything in your house in your target language using sticky notes. Use your relaxing TV time to watch TV in your target language. Essentially every time you can be exposed to input in your target language make sure you’re getting it.
  • Use In-Between Moments – There are countless moments in your day when you just sit there waiting for something. Maybe you’re waiting for an elevator, for a website to load, for the microwave to finish, for your turn to order at a restaurant – frequently with the proliferation of smartphones people use this time to check in on Facebook and Twitter. Instead, use them to practice a phrase or grammar structure you’re working on or to flip through some flashcards of new vocab.
  • Talk To Yourself – It doesn’t have to be loudly, particularly if you’re at work or on the subway or something (although muttering to yourself in a foreign language might guarantee people give you a little space to get comfortable), but talking to yourself in your target language is not only a good way to reinforce what you’ve learned and solidify it in your memory – it’s also a good way to develop the muscle memory for speaking. Speaking a language is a skill, and just like other skills the muscle you use to practice that skill (your mouth and related bits in this case) need to build up the motor pathways from repeated practice to make the skill feel most natural. The more you chat to yourself, even if you just move your lips and don’t vocalize, the more used to speaking that language you’ll get.

With all of these tactics you really have no excuse for being too busy to learn a language – so go get started! If you have any other helpful ways to pack more practice and study into limited share them in the comments!

Photo Credit: Chita21

The 5 Minute Morning Bodyweight Workout

Watch the Watch by Nicolasnova

Only 5 minutes every morning to be healthier, happier and feel better all day long.

There are some days when getting yourself to the gym is a huge struggle. It’s understandable, sometimes you’re really just not feeling it. The worst part is then you feel like crap the next day because you’re full of regret for skipping a lifting day.

Rather than let that get you down, why not take 5 minutes every morning to run through a light workout? Sure, it’s no replacement for heavy lifting, but putting in 5 minutes every morning will ensure that even on days when you skip your regularly scheduled workout you’ll still have done something.

What’s even better is exercise in the morning helps energize you for the rest of the day, so getting in one of these quick 5 minute workouts will help pump you up and make you less likely to want to skip that proper workout anyway. On top of that some research suggests that a quick fasted workout in the mornings helps increase your metabolism for the rest of the day.

You do have 5 minutes to spare when you crawl out of bed right? Come on. No excuses. Pick one of these and do them every morning as soon as your feet hit the floor and you’ll feel much, much better through the rest of your day.

Basic Workout

This basic body weight circuit will get you moving and shake the sleep off of you but isn’t intended to be a full workout. This is something you can do in the morning everyday when you wake up – even on days when you’re going to lift heavy later.

  • 10 Burpees – To do a burpee squat down until your hands are touching the ground, then kick your legs back into the top of a push up position. Lower yourself to the floor and then reverse the motion doing a push up, then kicking your legs back under you and standing up. That’s one.
  • 25 Squats – Each squat should go as low as possible with your heels staying planted on the ground and your back staying straight. If you need to put your hands out in front of you and stabilize yourself with a bed or the back of a chair that’s no problem as long as you’re going through the full range of motion.
  • 25 Inverted Rows – These will require a good sturdy table or desk. Most kitchen tables work just fine. You want to lay halfway underneath the table holding on to the edge with both hands. Pull yourself up so your chest touches the edge of the table and then lower yourself back down for one rep.
  • 25 Push Ups – These should be good solid form push ups through a full range of motion. If you’re not sure you can do a good push up try one of these push up variations.

Starting out you can do just one round of the circuit every morning. As you get more used to it you can add rounds up to the point where you’re going through the whole circuit three times.

In general I wouldn’t recommend running through the circuit more than three times in the morning – the idea here isn’t to get a heavy workout just to wake you up and get the blood flowing and get your muscles primed for the rest of the day.

Intermediate Workout

If you barely break a sweat doing three rounds of the basic workout give this slightly more advanced version a try. Just like the basic version start out at one round and work your way up to three.

  • 15 Burpees
  • 20 Split-Squats – Place one foot behind you up on a chair or bed so that just your instep is up on the support. Putting most of your weight on your front leg lower yourself down so that your back leg forms a 90 degree angle with the ground and then press yourself back up. Do 20 on each side.
  • 15 Pull Up Negatives – Negatives mean just the part of the movement that is aided by gravity. In the case of pull ups that means the part where you’re lowering yourself back down. Get to the top of the pull up position by jumping into it and then lower yourself back down in as slow and controlled a manner as possible for one rep.
  • 25 Decline Push Ups – These are the same as regular push ups except you put your feet on an elevated surface like a bed or chair. The higher your feet in relation to your hands the more difficult they become.

Lastly, if this workout is just too easy for you give the advanced version a try.

Advanced Workout

If you’re looking for more of a challenge than give this workout a try. For most people each of these movements are a good workout on their own.

  • 25 Burpees
  • 15 One Legged Squats / Pistols – Hold one leg out in front of you, do a full squat on the leg you’re still standing on for one rep. Do 15 on each side.
  • 10 Pull Ups
  • 20 One Armed Push Ups – The same as a standard push up except performed on only one arm with legs spread wider than normal. Do 20 on each side.

So there you go. One of these will fit pretty much everyone’s level, so pick one and start doing it each morning. I’ll admit, depending on rest times if you’re going for 3 rounds it may be more like 15 minutes – but you should have 5 to 15 minutes to spare every morning to be healthier, feel better and be happier through the day. Like I said before, no excuses.

If you’re interested in more in depth calisthenics workouts you can also find other systems like Bar Brothers that might suit your needs.

Have you tried any of these out yet? What do you think? Have another morning warm up workout you particularly love? Share it with us in the comments!

Photo Credit: Nicolasnova

365 Small Steps to Incredible

Interview Schedule by Wenzday01

Are a little better today at something than you were yesterday?

You can be incredible.

I mean that. You can be incredible. You can be the kind of person where people say, “Wow, I have no idea how he/she does it. I wish I could do that.” You can close your eyes at the end of each day reassured that you’re just a little better than you were the day before.

The best part? It’s easy to do and it only takes a few minutes a day.

The Power of Little Changes

Over enough time very small changes will accumulate into very, very big changes. You can see the evidence of that principle everywhere, a tiny bit of erosion every day over millions of years and you have the Grand Canyon. Through tiny, incremental changes single cell organisms diversified into the billions of species we know of and the even larger billions of species that’ve gone extinct before our time.

Lots of little changes add up to a big difference.

When you look at it through that lens, becoming incredible doesn’t look like such a daunting task – it just takes time. Unless you’re undead or some manner of cyborg you probably haven’t got eons to work with, but a year is a pretty long time on the scale of human life so let’s start there.

A Commitment to Improvement

You’ve got 365 days to play with in an average year. That’s 365 opportunities to become just a tiny bit better at something. 365 chances for you to improve yourself which, when added together, can make you incredible.

Imagine if you wanted to get good at playing guitar. Don’t you think you’d be pretty good if you got just a little better 365 times? Don’t you think you’d be pretty fit if you got just a little bit stronger or lost just a little bit of weight 365 times? Even a tenth of a pound of fat loss everyday (less than the 1.5 pound per week average) for a year adds up to 36.5 pounds of weight gone. That’s a big change.

The key is to make a promise to yourself to get just a little better at something every single day. Complete your run a second faster, write one more sentence, lift one more pound, learn one more word, meet one more person, spend one more minute meditating, practice one more parkour technique, whatever. Never ever settle for stagnation.

Paradoxically this is simultaneously easy and difficult. It’s easy because it generally only requires a few minutes per day – it’s not that painful to do just a bit more each day. It’s difficult because as a species we tend to be pretty lazy. We like to do the bare minimum to get by, so reminding yourself to go just that little bit further can get forgotten or ignored.

The best way to get around that is to write your goals down or put up reminders where you know you’ll find them. Stick notes up all over, put alarms and reminders on your phone, tell a friend to punch you in the face if you don’t do it – whatever works for you.

Don’t Worry About the Jones’

The goal here is to be incredible, sure. That definitely comes with a bit of egotism, but your primary drive shouldn’t be to be better than everyone else. That just gets frustrating. Instead you should worry about competing with yourself. If you’re better today than you were yesterday then that’s what’s important, not if you’re better than someone else.

If you stick to your commitment and improve every day – even if by a minuscule measure – by the end of the year you will have made an incredible improvement from where you were 365 days prior.

Are you committed to making yourself a little bit better every day? Do you think all this self-improvement stuff is a bunch of crap? Have any other tips to share to become incredible via incremental improvements? Share them in the comments!

Photo Credit: Wenzday01

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