Video Games, Process, & Success Dependence – How to Set Better Goals

Europa Univeralis IV Starting Screen

Europa Universalis IV players are often good examples of process driven individuals.

In general, people tend to fall into one of two categories in their approach to accomplishing a task. Either they’re result driven, or they’re process driven.

In my experience, of these two the process driven people tend to have more long term success when it comes to achieving the more difficult tasks. It seems to take far less willpower, or mental fortitude if you want to call it that, to tackle more difficult goals for those who are strongly process driven compared to those who are strongly result driven.

So how can we use that observation to help us set better goals, even if we naturally tend toward a result focus?

Result vs. Process in Video Games

The easiest way, for me anyway as a gamer, to demonstrate the two types of people is to look at the behaviors and attitudes of common players of two games.

On one hand you have players of a game like Awesomenauts (feel free to sub DOTA2 in here if you like, I just wanted to give Awesomenauts a shout out because I enjoy it). Awesomenauts players tend to be very strongly results focused. The game itself lends itself to this attitude – it’s a MOBA (multiplayer online battle arena) and, like traditional sports, your objective is to defeat the other team in a clearly defined manner.

You will frequently see players have severe meltdowns if it looks like they’re going to lose. The rage quit (abandoning the game in a fury because it doesn’t look like you’re going to win for you non-video game folk) is a semi-common occurrence, even though there are penalties built in to discourage it. Players can behave like irrational, whiny children who aren’t getting their way if it looks like they aren’t going to be victorious.

This attitude I thinks stems from, or is at least bolstered by, the game’s subconscious push for people to be results driven. Players fall into a myopic obsession with winning, with the result of the game, and as a result cannot enjoy the experience of playing unless they win, or feel like they’ll win. All that matters to them is the outcome.

Contrast that with players of some of Paradox’s grand strategy games like Crusader Kings II or Europa Universalis IV (EU4).

These games have no real win condition. Sure, you can try to conquer the entire globe, and there are ‘points’ so you could argue the objective the game sets for you is to get the most of them but it’s downplayed so much as to be essentially arbitrary.

Even in multiplayer EU4 players are essentially expected to create their own personal goals and ‘win’ conditions. I’ve noticed this structure seems to make people much more process focused. You won’t often see people rage quitting an EU4 game because ‘winning’ is a concept so divested from the core game and determinant on the whims of the player it would be foolish. EU4 players care more about the experience of playing, or the process of it, than they do about winning. Regardless of the result, they enjoy the process.

Before I get any hate mail from Awesomenauts players these are generalizations. Not every Awesomenauts player is a petulant child and not every EU4 player is a refined statesperson – but by looking at these generalizations we can see things that apply to tasks outside of gaming.

Are You Sabotaging Yourself by Being Too Results Focused

For a lot of people, their instinctive approach to set better goals is one falling much closer to the results focused manner the Awesomenauts players we discussed above approach their game.

It may be an endemic issue to U.S. culture, but a lot of people feel pushed to get results no matter what. They put the end result first, and approach things with that attitude of staking everything on ‘winning’ or accomplishing their goal. This can be a strong motivating factor, which is definitely a positive aspect, but it also ties the emotional payout of the experience into a very singular, specific factor.

That obsession with winning increases the reward payout of achieving the win condition – meeting your goal – but it also proportionately increases the emotional pain of not achieving the win condition – of failing to meet your goal.

In other words the more you conflate achieving your goal with being the most important best feeling thing in the world, the more failing to achieve it seems like the worst thing ever.

If you have the idea of losing tied to this strong emotional idea of pain, failure, and disappointment it’s easy to bail rather than risk experiencing that. That’s why rage quitting happens. It’s less painful emotionally to say, “Fuck this, if I can’t win I’m going home and taking my ball with me,” than to actually experience that loss. It’s an issue of pain avoidance, which is a very, very strongly wired an impulse in living things.

So why does that matter for my goals and learning to set better goals?

Let’s take fitness as an example. Partly because it’s common, partly because the societal connotations of pain & struggle being necessary for weight loss already tint it with the specter of pain avoidance.

Suppose you want to lose 15 pounds. You get really pumped about your goal. You’re seriously going to do it this time. You’re pumped. You are entirely and completely invested emotionally in that goal of being 15 pounds lighter.

Now suppose you’re three weeks in and, for whatever reason – a few too many drinks out with friends, general weight fluctuations, getting sick and missing some workouts, whatever, you hop on the scale and you’re back up five or six pounds. Maybe even back to where you started. It’s at this point that you’re most likely to throw in the towel, maybe not even consciously, but when your success is so strongly tied to reaching that goal and you see yourself sliding in the wrong direction that little voice that says, “Dude, just eat the pizza. Go get a box of doughnuts too. It’ll be fine,” gets a lot louder.

The same applies to your actual workouts – if all you’re focused on is the result, not seeing tangible progress destroys your motivation. If you look like you’re going to fail, it’s easier to just quit. Even though quitting’s the best way to guarantee failure.

Compare this with someone who has a purely process focused attitude toward fitness.

This person does it for a love of doing it, rather than solely to achieve an end result. To quote Gerald, “The journey is the destination, man.” Like the EU4 players they don’t care about what happens in the end, win or lose they’re there because they derive their fun from the process.

Ironically here the person who is less directly focused on and invested in that specific goal, losing 15 pounds for example, is the one who would have the easier time reaching it. If you stick to your macros and lift because you want to lift, because you have fun doing it, you’re not going to self-sabotage and quit like the person who slogs through it because they want that end result.

Developing Process Driven Goals

Shifting your focus to process driven goals instead of success dependent ones isn’t that hard externally – it’s a fairly simple process to rework outcome driven goals into process driven ones – but it can be extremely hard to change your mindset to embrace process driven goals more naturally.

The first step in changing a results driven goal into a process driven one is to figure out what processes are going to be most instrumental in making progress toward the result driven goal itself. We’ll go back to fitness as our example again.

If your outcome focused goal is to lose 15 pounds, a piece of the process to achieve that goal may be lifting weights three times per week. That process then becomes your goal – instead of setting out to ‘lose 15 pounds’ you set out to ‘lift three times per week’.

I’ll note here though that one of the finer points of this process is also asking yourself, “What can I do that falls into that category of helpful processes that I also enjoy?”

If you despise lifting weights, then just changing your focus to being process driven may not be enough if the process you choose is lifting weights. You may be better off making your process goal ‘swim three times per week’ or something like that which you particularly enjoy.

It can be very hard to change a long standing opinion on something. While you can grow to enjoy an activity you currently despise, it’s often a grueling process. It’s much easier to figure out something you enjoy that also helps you progress toward your goal than it is to learn to love an activity that you dislike.

In the end, that becomes the crux of it. Once you can find an activity related to your goal that you can wake up in the morning and think, “I really can’t wait to go X,” rather than “Ugh, I have to go Y again,” the easier and more quickly you’ll achieve those goals.

Do you have any suggestions on how to become more process driven or get away from outcome oriented goal setting to set better goals? Share them with us in the comments!

Adam is a former English teacher turned personal trainer and writer. He’s addicted to learning, parkour and martial arts. In addition to being a voracious bibliophile Adam’s fascinated by anything related to health, fitness and language. When not studying or training he can usually be found curled up with a good piece of fiction. You can e-mail Adam at Adam@RoadtoEpic.com