Why ‘I Don’t Have Time’ Is a Bullshit Excuse

Explored #1 by Bethan

There’s some time, grab it!

Out of just about every excuse in the world, the one I most despise is also the one I seem to hear most frequently – I don’t have time.

I don’t have time to learn a new language, I don’t have time to workout and get fit, I don’t have time to start a business, I don’t have time to do this or that or anything else.

Bullshit.

Not only am I going to explain why it’s an inane excuse, I’m going to show you ways you can ‘find the time’ to do everything you could possibly want to do and more.

There Are 24 Hours in a Day

Assuming you are on Earth and not off somewhere traveling at such speeds as to be strongly affected by time dilation then you have twenty four hours in your day to play with. No more, no fewer. This has always been the case since the day you were born. It’s not as though you will ever have to worry about adjusting to having fewer hours per day to manage.

So how is it exactly that you don’t have enough time?

Think of everyone who has ever achieved greatness throughout the entire span of human history – Archimedes, Michelangelo, Shakespeare, Ford, Jobs and anyone else you can think of who was successful – do you know how many hours they had to work with in a day?

Twenty four.

Same as you.

So clearly, ‘finding the time’ is not the issue. Inspirational men and women through time have demonstrably proven there to be ample time here on Earth to accomplish wonderfully incredible things, let alone the generally mundane stuff that most people use this excuse for. If Michelangelo can find the time to paint the Sistine Chapel, I’m reasonably certain you can find the time to workout three times a week.

Now I know that some of you are already going to start whining to the effect of, ‘You’re being too literal, when we say we don’t have the time we don’t mean the hours aren’t there we’re just too busy‘. Alright. Fine.

Still bullshit.

You Probably Suck at Managing Your Time

Most people just flat out suck at managing time. Certainly if you’re the kind of person who finds him or herself thinking that you wish you could do something but just don’t have the time to or are too busy then I can nearly guarantee you’re wretched at time management.

People love to say they’re too busy like it’s some kind of insurmountable external obstacle that they are in no way culpable for as it’s clearly dictated by forces beyond their control. It makes them feel like it’s not their fault for not trying to do whatever it is they wish they could do. It externalizes responsibility.

I think one of the biggest reasons people do this is fear. I think many people are just too terrified to fail so they’d rather stay stagnant where it’s comfortable and never even try. In reality you should embrace failure. It’s not something you should be afraid of.

People don’t want to admit they’re too scared to try though so they claim they don’t have the time to do it as a convenient excuse.

If you are someone, however, who honestly feels like you don’t have enough time to accomplish the things you want to accomplish then sit down one day and write out everything you did for every hour of the day up to that point. You can even go through and list everything you did that whole week if you’re feeling ambitious.

How much time did you spend watching TV? How much time did you spend on Facebook, or playing video games, or things like that?

If you’re anything like the average American you probably spend about three hours per day watching TV and about an hour per day playing games. That’s four hours everyday that you could devote to whatever it is you wish you could get done. That’s a full 1/6th of your whole day. More if you don’t count time spent sleeping.

You don’t even have to give up those full four hours, even shaving one off will make a big difference.

The question comes down to which is genuinely more important to you, being fit, learning a language or whatever it is you want to achieve or not missing Game of Thrones.

Reclaiming Your Time

The real key to it comes down to reclaiming your time for your own. Figuring out what your goals are and then, rather than making excuses for why you can’t pursue them, doing everything in your power to make it work. Here are a handful of tips to help you get started.

  • Prioritize – Figure out what is really important to you and cut out all the things you spend time on that don’t actually bring you toward something important. Don’t mistake this for a suggestion that all leisure time is evil, I watch TV and play video games too, the key is in knowing how much is too much.

  • Make Things Fun – If cutting down on things like TV and relaxation time are genuinely killing you, work to find things that are fun or help you relax that also further your goals, at least passively. If you want to be more fit, go play basketball or go for a walk instead of planting yourself in front of a TV or computer. If you’re looking to learn a new language watch TV in your target language instead of your native one. Find ways to combine your relaxation time with something helpful.

  • Eliminate Distractions – A great deal of time is wasted because the nature of our modern world is one rife with distractions. It’s common now to have all of your social networks right in your pocket, jumping and chirping with every update in an attempt to drag your attention away from whatever other thing you were engaged with. When you add on to that the time devouring void that is the Internet it’s easy to lose track of what you’re doing.

    Do whatever needs to be done to eliminate all of these distractions. Turn your phone off and put it in another room. Get a program like Rescue Time or one that shuts of your Internet if you don’t need it for your task. Whatever it takes – the key is to remove the temptation to engage with and become entranced by potential diversions.

  • Get Rid of Your TV – I think there are plenty of good reasons to give away your TV. Having a TV in your living room or bedroom is just an invitation to sit around and waste time. Get rid of it.

    That’s not to say that you shouldn’t watch any TV, just that it should be a focused activity like everything else you do. A lot of people just plop down in front of their set and then go hunting to see what’s on. Instead, pick what you want to watch beforehand, seek it out and watch it and be done. Hulu and Netflix are both great for this. We have a handful of shows we enjoy enough to watch deliberately like The Walking Dead, but we don’t spend much other time watching TV. As a result we spend an average of less than an hour a day watching things, and since I see all the shows I want to see I don’t feel like I’m missing out.

  • Recapture Down Time – There are a lot of small chunks of time spread throughout the day that tend to just get lost. These are moments in-between things or while you’re waiting. Moments spent in line for your espresso, waiting for a file to download or standing around until the elevator arrives.

    All of these moments can be recaptured and spent doing something very little that adds up into something substantial when leveraged over days and weeks. Pulling out your phone and doing three Memrise sessions takes a grand total of maybe five or six minutes. Three Memrise sessions adds up to about 15 new words, add in another five minutes to refresh old memories and in ten minutes per day you can learn 15 new words.

    You certainly can pull ten minutes together throughout the day, especially since it doesn’t have to be all at once. Doing a Memrise session every time you have to wait for the elevator in your building barely counts as effort, but compounded over two months that’s about 1,000 new words you’ve learned.

  • Timebox – Using timeboxing is an excellent way not only to ensure that you get everything on your to-do list done, but also to help motivate you to tackle the bigger tasks that you’ve been dreading. Best of all since the very nature of timeboxing, setting a specific temporal constraint beyond which you’re forbidden to work on a given task, means that it directly restricts you from getting too absorbed in one project to have time for everything else you need to work on.

These are just a few things you can do to ‘find the time’ that you swear you don’t have to accomplish your goals. If you can think of any others you particularly like definitely leave a comment and share them with everyone. Let us know too what you’re going to go out an accomplish now that the bullshit excuse of not enough time has been put to rest.

Photo Credit: Bethan

Adam is a former English teacher turned personal trainer and writer. He’s addicted to learning, parkour and martial arts. In addition to being a voracious bibliophile Adam’s fascinated by anything related to health, fitness and language. When not studying or training he can usually be found curled up with a good piece of fiction. You can e-mail Adam at Adam@RoadtoEpic.com